Assessment of Real Estate and Other Properties

Tax assessment cards are now in the mail.

Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 54:4-38.1, every municipal tax assessor, prior to February 1, shall provide, by mail, each taxpayer with the current assessment on the taxpayer’s property and the property taxes that were levied on the property the preceding year. Thereafter, the assessor or county board of taxation shall notify each taxpayer by mail within 30 days of any change to the assessment.

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Accordingly, all property owners should now be on the lookout for their assessment cards. If you do not receive your tax assessment card in the very near future, it is strongly advised that you contact http://www.valsnsw.com.au local tax assessor immediately in order to inquire as to what the current tax assessment is for your property.

The statutory deadline to file a tax appeal in New Jersey is a strict statutory deadline. N.J.S.A. 54:3-21 provides that all tax appeals must be filed by April 1st, or 45 days from the date the bulk mailing of notification of assessment is completed in the taxing district, whichever is later. Furthermore, in a taxing district where a municipal-wide revaluation or municipal-wide reassessment has been implemented, a taxpayer must file a property tax appeal before or on May 1st.

This standard is very easy for a tax assessor to meet. As a result, taxpayers are almost always presumed to have received the tax assessment card that was allegedly mailed by a municipality’s tax assessor. Consequently, if a taxpayer chooses to appeal an assessment after the statutory filing deadline (listed above) on the basis that the taxpayer never received the tax assessment notice from the tax assessor, the taxpayer must proof to the court, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the taxpayer did not, in fact, receive the tax assessment notice.

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